Rolling out the Red Carpet for Customers: Why Service Matters

Oscar season just ended, and if you are a movie aficionado like me you may have kept up with all of the red-carpet action. Well recently, I had my own first-hand experience with a red carpet. Was I wearing Valentino or Marchesa you may ask? Unfortunately no, but it did leave a lasting impression.

The red-carpet experience I had was as a customer. After taking advantage of a President’s Day mattress sale, I purchased a new mattress. But the first attempt at delivery didn’t leave me very satisfied.

The delivery team couldn’t fit my new box spring up the stairway and told me I needed split box springs. Right… so how did the original box spring that was the same size get up there one wonders? Frankly, I got the impression they just didn’t want to make the effort.

This was not the best start, and without mobile tools to see if they had the box springs I needed in the warehouse and the ability to place the order instantly, I wondered when I would actually get to enjoy a good night’s sleep on my new mattress.

All in all, I was not having the best day. But after placing another order, I was given a new delivery date, and then my customer experience changed altogether.

With the new delivery, I was greeted with different workers who literally rolled out a red carpet to bring in my new mattress and box springs. They were friendly and genuinely concerned about my happiness, and this left me feeling more like a valued customer. They redeemed themselves. My opinion of them shifted. I’ll definitely buy from them again in the future.

Creating customer value in your service organizations is paramount. It’s not just satisfaction with the end product, but the entire experience – which includes how long it takes to solve a service issue. We are all someone’s customer and that’s why improving customer service is so personal.

If your service organization is not focused on the end-to-end lifecycle of service, you are not only risking customer satisfaction levels but service revenues and profitability. When your customer is unhappy with the level of service they are receiving, they won’t continue to do business with you, which not only damages your competitive position in the marketplace, but your bottom line too.

How do you make sure your customer is achieving maximum value over the entire serviceable life of your products? Make sure you have a single view into your extended service network that connects the planning, delivery, and analysis of service. When you have clear visibility into all of the service processes that come together to give your customer a quality experience your service organization is not only making your customer happier but increasing loyalty and profits.

So, are you rolling out red carpet service to your customer? As a service leader, take a step back and think about the level of service you expect when you are a customer and then ask yourself if your service organization has the right organizational structure, culture, processes, and technology in place to provide the best value to your customer. If you are like most service organizations you are challenged in some of these areas and it’s time to make service transformation a priority.

Attend PTC Live Service Exchange, June 11-12, Anaheim, CA to learn more about improving service performance across the entire service organization.

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About Michelle Duke Hopkins

Michelle Hopkins is a Marketing Program Director for PTC based in Atlanta, GA. She focuses on researching and developing content around the challenges service executives face and how Service Lifecycle Management (SLM) can help improve customer value, service revenues and overall profitability. Prior to PTC, she was Director of Public Relations for Servigistics, where she led global media and analyst relations for SLM and was editor of the SLM Hub blog. She has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Journalism from the University of Georgia.
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